Parent's Corner

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Parenting 24/7 
PBS Parents 
‚ÄčParenting Priorities 
Family Education 
Parent-to-Parent 
Parents Smart 
Cool Math 4 Parents 
National Center for Learning Disabilities  
NEA:Help for Parents  
 

 

Math

 

Reading

 

Writing

Help Your Child Learn to Write Well

Writing Fun at Home(Here is a copy of thepaper diethey talk about in the article)

Creative Writing

 

Spelling

Help Your Child Ace the Spelling Test

Fun Spelling Practice Ideas

"No Excuses" Spelling Words

More Fun Ways to Practice Spelling

Spelling Time- You can enter your own spelling words onto this site and activities/quizzes are made based on those words!

 

 

 

ABC's of Parenting

A sk your child about the school day. 

B egin your child's day with a nourishing breakfast. 

C ongratulate your child for doing well. 

D iscuss homework with your child. 

E ncourage your child to read. 

F ind a quiet place for your child to study. 

G ive your child responsibilities. 

H ug your child to build self-worth. 

I nclude your child in making simple family decisions. 

J oin a library with your child. 

K eep your child on a schedule that includes exercise and sleep. 

L imit TV viewing by selecting programs with your child. 

M ake the time you spend with your child special. 

N otice and discuss changes in your child's behavior. 

O ffer to help your child organize school papers. 

P rovide your child with good role models. 

Q uestion the activities your child shares with friends. 

R espect your child's right to have opinions different from yours. 

S hare an interest or a hobby with your child. 

T ake time to listen to your child. 

U rge your child to say "NO!" to unwanted touching. 

V isit places of interest with your child. 

W ork with your child to set up rules of behavior. 

X erox and save records or articles that benefit your child. 

Y ield results by encouraging your child to do better. 

Z oom through these ABCs again and again. 
 

 

Author Unknown

 

                                                 

HELP ORGANIZE YOUR CHILD

 

Developing good organizational skills is the key ingredient for success in school and in life. Although some people by nature are more organized 
than others, anyone can put routines and systems in place to help a child become more organized.  Here is a list of strategies you can use to help your child develop good organizational skills and become a more organized learner. 

1. Use Checklists: Help your child get into the habit of keeping a 
"to-do" list. Use checklists to post assignments, household chores, 
and reminders about materials to bring to class. Crossing completed 
tasks off the list will give him/her a sense of accomplishment. 

2. Designate a study space: Your child should study in the same place every night. This doesn't have to be a bedroom, but it should be a quiet place with few distractions. All school supplies should be nearby. If your child wants to study with you nearby, it's alright, this way you can have 
the opportunity to monitor progress and encourage good study habits. 

3. Set a designated study time: Your child should know that a certain 
time every day is reserved for studying and doing homework. The best time is usually not right after school.  Most children benefit from time to unwind first. Include your child in making this decision. Even if he /she doesn't  have homework, that time should be reserved for reading for pleasure,  practicing handwriting, working on an upcoming project, etc. 

4. Conduct a weekly clean-up: Encourage your child to sort through 
book bags, folder, agendas and notebooks on a weekly basis. Old 
papers should be removed and kept in a separate place at home. 

5. Create a household schedule: Try to establish and stick to a regular dinnertime and regular bedtime. This will help your child fall into a pattern at home. Children with a regular bedtime go to school well rested. Try to limit television watching and 
computer play to specific periods of time during the day. 

6. Prepare for the day ahead: Before your child goes to bed, he/she should pack schoolwork and books in their 
backpack. The next day's clothes should be laid out with shoes and accessories. This will cut down on morning confusion and allow your child to prepare quickly for the day ahead. 

7. Create a household calendar: Keep a large calendar for the 
household that lists the family's commitments, schedules, 
extracurricular activities, days off from school and major events at home and at school. Note dates when your child has tests and due dates for projects. 

8. Provide necessary support while your child is learning to become more organized: Help your child develop organizational skills by photocopying checklists and schedules and taping them to the refrigerator. Gently 
remind them about filling in the important dates and keeping papers and materials organized. Most importantly, set a good example. 

Adapted from "Tips for Developing Organizational Skills in Children" 
by the CCLD


 

Reading

 

Writing

Help Your Child Learn to Write Well
Writing Fun at Home (Here is a copy of the paper die they talk about in the article)
Creative Writing

 

Spelling

Help Your Child Ace the Spelling Test
Fun Spelling Practice Ideas
"No Excuses" Spelling Words
More Fun Ways to Practice Spelling
Spelling Time - You can enter your own spelling words onto this site and activities/quizzes are made based on those words!

 

 

 

ABC's of Parenting

sk your child about the school day. 

egin your child's day with a nourishing breakfast. 

ongratulate your child for doing well. 

iscuss homework with your child. 

ncourage your child to read. 

ind a quiet place for your child to study. 

ive your child responsibilities. 

ug your child to build self-worth. 

nclude your child in making simple family decisions. 

oin a library with your child. 

eep your child on a schedule that includes exercise and sleep. 

imit TV viewing by selecting programs with your child. 

ake the time you spend with your child special. 

otice and discuss changes in your child's behavior. 

ffer to help your child organize school papers. 

rovide your child with good role models. 

uestion the activities your child shares with friends. 

espect your child's right to have opinions different from yours. 

hare an interest or a hobby with your child. 

ake time to listen to your child. 

rge your child to say "NO!" to unwanted touching. 

isit places of interest with your child. 

ork with your child to set up rules of behavior. 

erox and save records or articles that benefit your child. 

ield results by encouraging your child to do better. 

oom through these ABCs again and again. 
 

 

Author Unknown

 

                                                 
HELP ORGANIZE YOUR CHILD

 

Developing good organizational skills is the key ingredient for success in school and in life. Although some people by nature are more organized 
than others, anyone can put routines and systems in place to help a child become more organized.  Here is a list of strategies you can use to help your child develop good organizational skills and become a more organized learner. 

1. Use Checklists: Help your child get into the habit of keeping a 
"to-do" list. Use checklists to post assignments, household chores, 
and reminders about materials to bring to class. Crossing completed 
tasks off the list will give him/her a sense of accomplishment. 

2. Designate a study space: Your child should study in the same place every night. This doesn't have to be a bedroom, but it should be a quiet place with few distractions. All school supplies should be nearby. If your child wants to study with you nearby, it's alright, this way you can have 
the opportunity to monitor progress and encourage good study habits. 

3. Set a designated study time: Your child should know that a certain 
time every day is reserved for studying and doing homework. The best time is usually not right after school.  Most children benefit from time to unwind first. Include your child in making this decision. Even if he /she doesn't  have homework, that time should be reserved for reading for pleasure,  practicing handwriting, working on an upcoming project, etc. 

4. Conduct a weekly clean-up: Encourage your child to sort through 
book bags, folder, agendas and notebooks on a weekly basis. Old 
papers should be removed and kept in a separate place at home. 

5. Create a household schedule: Try to establish and stick to a regular dinnertime and regular bedtime. This will help your child fall into a pattern at home. Children with a regular bedtime go to school well rested. Try to limit television watching and 
computer play to specific periods of time during the day. 

6. Prepare for the day ahead: Before your child goes to bed, he/she should pack schoolwork and books in their 
backpack. The next day's clothes should be laid out with shoes and accessories. This will cut down on morning confusion and allow your child to prepare quickly for the day ahead. 

7. Create a household calendar: Keep a large calendar for the 
household that lists the family's commitments, schedules, 
extracurricular activities, days off from school and major events at home and at school. Note dates when your child has tests and due dates for projects. 

8. Provide necessary support while your child is learning to become more organized: Help your child develop organizational skills by photocopying checklists and schedules and taping them to the refrigerator. Gently 
remind them about filling in the important dates and keeping papers and materials organized. Most importantly, set a good example. 

Adapted from "Tips for Developing Organizational Skills in Children" 
by the CCLD